Join a National Diabetes Prevention Program

Do I have prediabetes?

National Diabetes Prevention Program

The CDC-led National Diabetes Prevention Program offers scientifically proven and effective lifestyle change programs that can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.

  • The program can show you how to make better food choices, be more physically active, and find helpful ways to cope with problems and stress.
  • You'll work with a trained lifestyle coach and a small group of people who are all working towards the same goal.
  • It’ll last for 1 year (including meetings about once per week in the first 6 months).
  • The hundreds of local community partners are required by CDC to meet high standards and prove results.
  • You can do it in person, or online.

This is a proven program to motivate and support people with prediabetes to make practical, real-life changes, and cut their risk of developing type 2 diabetes by more than half. That's kind of big news.

The hundreds of organizations across the U.S. that offer these programs are focused on one thing only — positive results. So use our program locator to find one near you.

Would I qualify for the National Diabetes Prevention Program?+

Usually, your doctor can tell you if you qualify. It's generally based on your body mass index (which is based on your height and weight), your blood sugar levels (blood test), your age (must be 18 or older), and if you have a history of gestational diabetes (meaning you developed diabetes when you were pregnant). You may also qualify based on results from the online risk test. Just one more reason to take it!

Is there an out-of-pocket cost for the National Diabetes Prevention Program?+

Costs for the program are often covered by insurance providers or employers. For some people, there may be a cost. Check with your employer or insurance provider to see if the program is a covered benefit for you.

Lifestyle Tips

Making changes may seem tough. But remember, even a small amount of weight loss can usually help prevent type 2 diabetes. While not everyone will be able to fully reverse prediabetes depending on risk factors, most people will be able to lower their risk through physical activity and healthier eating habits. If you can't join a diabetes prevention program right now, there are some things you can do in the meantime to lower your risk for type 2 diabetes. These are the kinds of tips you’ll receive through the program. So read away!

  • Losing just 5-7 percent of your body weight can slow or even reverse prediabetes. For a person who weighs 200 pounds, that’s only 10-15 pounds.
  • Staying at this healthy weight in the long run is very important to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Being more active and eating healthier are great ways to help manage your weight.
  • The key to boosting your chances for success is to make a realistic plan and to set realistic goals. Maybe start with one change in your diet and one new type of activity. Remember to take it one step at a time, and stay patient. Permanent weight loss won’t happen overnight. Click here for a guide to help you get started.
  • Want more tips on how you can manage your weight? Click here.

  • Get at least 2.5 hours (150 minutes) of light aerobic activity every week. This could be as simple as going for a brisk 30-minute walk 5 days per week. Even 10 minutes at a time adds up. Small steps can lead to big changes.
  • Find simple ways to be more active throughout the day, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or parking farther away from the entrance of a store front when you hit the shops. Because, hey, whatever will get you moving is a step in the right direction.
  • At the start of each week, create a schedule of when you’re going to exercise — and make it a priority to stick to it!
  • Get resources that can help you get active here.

  • Believe it or not, salads CAN be delicious. Look up interesting ways to prepare them and other vegetables, and aim to eat at least one at dinner every night.
  • Low-fat doesn’t have to be low on flavor. So try to cook in these ways: roast, broil, grill, steam or bake — instead of deep-frying or pan-frying.
  • Reading food labels is so important. The more you know about what goes into your food, the better decisions you’ll be able to make. Also, try and cut down on foods with saturated fat or trans-fat, and hydrogenated fat or partially hydrogenated fat. Check labels to help you make healthy choices.
  • Choose foods with less sodium than your usual choices.
  • If you can keep track of your family’s crazy schedule, keeping track of your daily fat grams and calorie intake should be a breeze! Here’s a handy tracker you can download, print and share, and will help you make eating healthier a regular thing.

  • There are countless reasons to quit smoking. So why not make a list of reasons that make the most sense for you?
  • Ask others for their help and understanding. Ask a friend who smokes to consider quitting with you. It can often be easier that way.
  • Talk with your doctor about treatments or programs that can help you quit smoking.
  • Get more tips on how you can quit smoking here.

Lifestyle Tips

Making changes may seem tough. But remember, even a small amount of weight loss can usually help prevent type 2 diabetes. If you can't join a diabetes prevention program right now, there are some things you can do in the meantime to lower your risk for type 2 diabetes. These are the kinds of tips you’ll receive through the program. So read away!

Manage your weight+

  • Losing just 5-7 percent of your body weight can slow or even reverse prediabetes. For a person who weighs 200 pounds, that’s only 10-15 pounds.
  • Staying at this healthy weight in the long run is very important to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. Being more active and eating healthier are great ways to help manage your weight.
  • The key to boosting your chances for success is to make a realistic plan and to set realistic goals. Maybe start with one change in your diet and one new type of activity. Remember to take it one step at a time, and stay patient. Permanent weight loss won’t happen overnight. Click here for a guide to help you get started.
  • Want more tips on how you can manage your weight? Click here.

Get active+

  • Get at least 2.5 hours (150 minutes) of light aerobic activity every week. This could be as simple as going for a brisk 30-minute walk 5 days per week. Even 10 minutes at a time adds up. Small steps can lead to big changes.
  • Find simple ways to be more active throughout the day, like taking the stairs instead of the elevator, or parking farther away from the entrance of a store front when you hit the shops. Because, hey, whatever will get you moving is a step in the right direction.
  • At the start of each week, create a schedule of when you’re going to exercise — and make it a priority to stick to it!
  • Get resources that can help you get active here.

Eat healthier+

  • Believe it or not, salads CAN be delicious. Look up interesting ways to prepare them and other vegetables, and aim to eat at least one at dinner every night.
  • Low-fat doesn’t have to be low on flavor. So try to cook in these ways: roast, broil, grill, steam or bake — instead of deep-frying or pan-frying.
  • Reading food labels is so important. The more you know about what goes into your food, the better decisions you’ll be able to make. Also, try and cut down on foods with saturated fat or trans-fat, and hydrogenated fat or partially hydrogenated fat. Check labels to help you make healthy choices.
  • Choose foods with less sodium than your usual choices.
  • If you can keep track of your family’s crazy schedule, keeping track of your daily fat grams and calorie intake should be a breeze! Here’s a handy tracker you can download, print and share, and will help you make eating healthier a regular thing.

Quit smoking+

  • There are countless reasons to quit smoking. So why not make a list of reasons that make the most sense for you?
  • Ask others for their help and understanding. Ask a friend who smokes to consider quitting with you. It can often be easier that way.
  • Talk with your doctor about treatments or programs that can help you quit smoking.
  • Get more tips on how you can quit smoking here.

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Join a National Diabetes Prevention Program

Do I have prediabetes?